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Anesthesia at Coyne Oral Surgery

Patients at Coyne Oral Surgery have many types of anesthesia available to them. Dr. Coyne will select the appropriate anesthesia based on your procedure and level of apprehension. Learn more below.

Local Anesthetic

Local anesthetic is used when patients are to remain fully conscious throughout the procedure. A local anesthetic like lidocaine is injected directly into the surgical area; it is often used alongside other types of anesthesia during oral surgery.

Usual Indications: Common in minor soft tissue oral surgery procedures and tooth extractions.

Office Based General Anesthesia with Local Anesthetic

General anesthesia is administered through an intravenous line (I.V.). These medications, including Fentanyl (opiate), Versed (benzodiazepine), Ketamine, and Diprivan, are used in tandem with supplemental oxygen. Patients’ vital signs are monitored closely throughout the procedure.

Usual Indications: General anesthesia can be used for all kinds of oral surgeries. They may even be used for simple procedures if patients have a high level of anxiety. GA is commonly used for wisdom teeth removal, dental implant placement, and in the event that local anesthesia cannot provide relief at the site of an infection.

Who Administers General Anesthesia?

To administer general anesthesia, oral surgeons must complete a minimum of three months of training in the hospital setting. Then, qualified applicants must pass an in-office evaluation by a state dental board appointed examiner in order to be granted licensure. The license is renewable every two years as long as the physician maintains the appropriate continuing education units.

At Coyne Oral Surgery, our patients’ comfort and safety is our top priority. If you have questions or concerns about the anesthesia used in your oral surgery, please ask Dr. Coyne at your initial consultation.

Intravenous Sedation (“Twilight Sedation”)

Known as Intravenous Sedation, Dental Intravenous Anesthesia, or “Twilight Sedation,” this form of anesthesia promotes comfort and calm. Patients are not always “asleep,” as is the case with general anesthesia, but may drift in and out, always in a relaxed state. This option can reduce expenses for patients significantly as the sedation may be administered and monitored by Dr. Coyne in-office; an operating room or same-day surgical facility is not required.

IV sedation is carried out with a goal of using as little anesthesia as necessary in order to complete the treatment safely and comfortably. Effects can easily be increased or reversed through a drip.

Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas)

Very common among oral surgeons, nitrous oxide is a sedative that consists of ~30% nitrous oxide and ~50-70% oxygen. When breathing this gas, patients can remain in full control of their bodily functions, but may experience mild amnesia and sleepiness while breathing the gas. Advantages include…

  • Level of sedation can be easily increased or decreased
  • There is no “hangover” from nitrous oxide
  • Very safe – no heart/lung side effects
  • Very effective in minimizing gagging.
  • Works rapidly (nitrous oxide reaches the brain in 20 seconds). Takes only two to three minutes to take effect.

If you have emphysema, chest issues, multiple sclerosis, a cold, or other difficulties breathing, you may be advised to use a different form of anesthesia.

Anesthesia at Coyne Oral Surgery

Patients at Coyne Oral Surgery have many types of anesthesia available to them. Dr. Coyne will select the appropriate anesthesia based on your procedure and level of apprehension. Learn more below.

Local Anesthetic

Local anesthetic is used when patients are to remain fully conscious throughout the procedure. A local anesthetic like lidocaine is injected directly into the surgical area; it is often used alongside other types of anesthesia during oral surgery.

Usual Indications: Common in minor soft tissue oral surgery procedures and tooth extractions.

Office Based General Anesthesia with Local Anesthetic

General anesthesia is administered through an intravenous line (I.V.). These medications, including Fentanyl (opiate), Versed (benzodiazepine), Ketamine, and Diprivan, are used in tandem with supplemental oxygen. Patients’ vital signs are monitored closely throughout the procedure.

Usual Indications: General anesthesia can be used for all kinds of oral surgeries. They may even be used for simple procedures if patients have a high level of anxiety. GA is commonly used for wisdom teeth removal, dental implant placement, and in the event that local anesthesia cannot provide relief at the site of an infection.

Who Administers General Anesthesia?

To administer general anesthesia, oral surgeons must complete a minimum of three months of training in the hospital setting. Then, qualified applicants must pass an in-office evaluation by a state dental board appointed examiner in order to be granted licensure. The license is renewable every two years as long as the physician maintains the appropriate continuing education units.

At Coyne Oral Surgery, our patients’ comfort and safety is our top priority. If you have questions or concerns about the anesthesia used in your oral surgery, please ask Dr. Coyne at your initial consultation.

Intravenous Sedation (“Twilight Sedation”)

Known as Intravenous Sedation, Dental Intravenous Anesthesia, or “Twilight Sedation,” this form of anesthesia promotes comfort and calm. Patients are not always “asleep,” as is the case with general anesthesia, but may drift in and out, always in a relaxed state. This option can reduce expenses for patients significantly as the sedation may be administered and monitored by Dr. Coyne in-office; an operating room or same-day surgical facility is not required.

IV sedation is carried out with a goal of using as little anesthesia as necessary in order to complete the treatment safely and comfortably. Effects can easily be increased or reversed through a drip.

Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas)

Very common among oral surgeons, nitrous oxide is a sedative that consists of ~30% nitrous oxide and ~50-70% oxygen. When breathing this gas, patients can remain in full control of their bodily functions, but may experience mild amnesia and sleepiness while breathing the gas. Advantages include…

  • Level of sedation can be easily increased or decreased
  • There is no “hangover” from nitrous oxide
  • Very safe – no heart/lung side effects
  • Very effective in minimizing gagging.
  • Works rapidly (nitrous oxide reaches the brain in 20 seconds). Takes only two to three minutes to take effect.

If you have emphysema, chest issues, multiple sclerosis, a cold, or other difficulties breathing, you may be advised to use a different form of anesthesia.

Common Questions About PRF

Is PRF safe?
Yes. This outpatient surgical procedure requires just a small amount of blood from the patient. The platelets take less than 15 minutes to be ready for use.

Is PRF appropriate for all bone-grafting cases?
Not necessarily. Sometimes, there is no need for PRF. Oftentimes, however, the use of PRF can help increase the total amount of bone present while also speeding up the wound-healing process.

Does insurance cover the cost of PRF?
No. PRF applications are paid by the patient.

Will PRF stimulate bone formation on its own?
No. PRF has to be used with the patient’s own bone, a bone substitute, or a synthetic bone product.Are there any contraindications to PRF? Very few. If you have a bleeding disorder or blood-related disease, you will not qualify for this procedure.

Ask Dr. Coyne if PRF is right for you.